Current / Past Research / Research By Category

News 09.16.16

The Sam Noble Museum had another fantastic Science in Action event last weekend, with booths run from all over the museum, campus and Oklahoma (highlights included the Oklahoma Biological Survey and the Museum of Osteology). The museum holds the event annually and it is a great opportunity for the general public to enjoy the galleries for FREE, learn about what types of research...


News 08.05.15

This is the third in a series featuring the recent OU graduates who are members of the Siler Lab.  In their own words, they will highlight the experiences they had with us as students, volunteers and/or employees.  Begin the series here with Rachel Flanagan. I started working in Dr. Cameron Siler’s herpetology lab as my honors thesis project my senior year.  While I had...


News 04.22.15

Two of the Siler Lab members who received internal research grants presented their findings at OU’s annual Undergraduate Research Day on April 18, 2015.  Tucker Walton gave an oral presentation entitled “Delineating morphometric characters for use in snake species descriptions” with the help of Matt DeRuyter, Jessa Watters, and Cameron Siler.  Matt DeRuyter presented a poster entitled “Preliminary Phylogenetic Study of the Lizard Genus...


News 10.22.14

I know, not another pit viper.  These continue to be some of my favorite reptiles to photograph in the wild.  This species of viper in the Philippines (Trimereserus flavomaculatus) can be incredibly variable in its phenotype, with some populations possessing completely different color patterns....


News 10.21.14

This photograph was taken by Cameron D. Siler on a recent expedition to the eastern Philippines.  The Philippine species of these beautiful vipers are actually quite easy to photograph, and once settled in a position are quite docile, allowing for great macro photography!...


News 10.12.14

This common tree snake was photographed by Cameron D. Siler on a recent expedition to the eastern Philippines.  It took quite a few shots to get the tongue in focus....


Research 10.01.14

Background Aposematic Batesian mimicry occurs when one relatively harmless species has a close resemblance to a dangerous or poisonous different species. Over time, as the two species live in close proximity, the individuals of the harmless species that more closely resemble the dangerous species will have higher survival and reproduction rates, leading to a population that appears dangerous. This mimicry is often...


Publications 09.15.13

The diverse group of Asian wolf snakes of the genus Lycodon represents one of many poorly understood radiations of advanced snakes in the superfamily Colubroidea. Outside of three species having previously been represented in higher-level phylogenetic analyses, nothing is known of the relationships among species in this unique, moderately diverse, group. The genus occurs widely from central to Southeast Asia, and contains...